Tolle Lege: Whiter Than Snow

Readability:  1

Length: 154

Author: Paul David Tripp

This is good medicine for the soul. There is bitterness and healing in this medicine, the kind of healing that can only come from bitter medicine. Tripp writes extremely well in these 52 meditations on the 51st Psalm. As the subtitle says, Whiter than Snow is a collection of “Meditations on Sin and Mercy”. The meditations are brief, averaging around two pages, but profound. This would be a great book to read one chapter a week for a year. This might be an exercise and a resource I recommend to new Christians so that the gravity of sin and redemption settles deeply into their soul.

It would also be tempting to think that the greatest victory in David’s life was his victory over the Philistines with their mighty Goliath. Yet this story, and the psalm that goes with it, points us to the fact that the greatest victory in David’s life was not a victory of war but a victory of grace. It is amazing to watch this hardened adulterer and murderer brought to confession and repentance by the power of God’s grace. And it is incredible that he does not lose his throne and, in fact, becomes a man who is known as “a man after God’s own heart”! The greatest victory in David’s life was not a victory of David’s at all, but, rather, God’s victory of grace over the sin that had captivated David’s heart.

The character of life isn’t set in ten big moments. The character of life is set in then thousand little moments of everyday life. It’s the themes of struggles that emerge from those little moments that reveal what’s really going on in our hearts.

The older you get the more you move from being an astronaut to an archaeologist. When you’re young, you’re excitedly launching to worlds unknown. You have all of the major decisions of life before you, and you can spend your time assessing your potential and considering opportunities. It’s a time of exploration and discovery. It’s a time to go where you’ve never been before and to do what you’ve never done. It’s a time to begin to use your training and to gain experience.

But as you get older, you begin to look back at least as much as you look forward. As you look back, you tend to dig through the mound of the civilization that was your past life, looking for pottery shards of thoughts, desires, choices, actions, words, decisions, relationships, and situations. And as you do this, you can’t help but assess how you have done with what you have been given.

My sin is an act where I replace You, with something I love more.

There’s a deeper birth trauma than the physical suffering that both mother and child must endure in order for the child to be born. The deeper, more profound trauma is the devastating reality that you can’t stop yourself from giving birth to a sinner. It happens 100 percent of the time. It’s the natal disease for which there is no inoculation.

[S]isn’t an event; no, it’s a progressive movement of the heart that results in disobedient behavior.

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